photo © Marc Doradzillo

exhibition view

Material Gestures, Galerie für Gegenwartskunst, E-Werk, Freiburg / D, 2018

photo © Marc Doradzillo

Detail Figure 2, 2018

steel, steel sheet, latex, paint, silicone oil, 260 x 115 x 115 cm

Material Gestures, Galerie für Gegenwartskunst, E-Werk, Freiburg / D, 2018

photo © Marc Doradzillo

Twist 3, 2018

latex, steel, epoxy, silicone oil, 12 x 15 x 12 cm, latex variable

Material Gestures, Galerie für Gegenwartskunst, E-Werk, Freiburg / D, 2018

exhibition view

Champagnola, Westwerk, Hamburg / D, 2018

Figure 1, 2018

latex, steel, silicone oil, 190 x 90 x 20 cm

Champagnola, Westwerk, Hamburg / D, 2018

Head 5, Head 6, 2018

steel sheet, paint, silicone oil, 50 x 40 x 23 cm

Champagnola, Westwerk, Hamburg / D, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

exhibition view

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Twist 1, 2018

latex, steel, epoxy, 15 x 14 x 15 cm, latex variable

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

exhibition view

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Hanging, 2018

latex, steel, silicone oil, dimensions variable

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Eyes 1, 2018

steel, steel sheet, magnets, lazy susan, wax, 200 x 127 x 79 cm

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Twist 2, 2018

latex, steel, epoxy, 14 x 11 x 14 cm, latex variable

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

exhibition view

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Head 1, 2017

sheet steel, paint, silicone oil, 47 x 37 x 11 cm

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

exhibition view

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Head 2, 2017

sheet steel, silicone oil, 47 x 37 x 11 cm

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Eyes 2, 2018

steel, steel sheet, magnets, lazy susan, wax, 295 x 150 x 77 cm

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

photo © Peter Mochi

Head 3, 2017

sheet steel, paint, silicone oil, 29 x 37 x 11 cm

MAXIMAL SOFT, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2018

MAXIMAL SOFT at Sophie Tappeiner

In MAXIMAL SOFT, this subtle reflection on how and why certain materials work together, Liesl Raff asks how different materials can be ‘friends’ with each other. How can these odd couples, she asks, complement and improve each other? Not merely by analogy, these materials become ‘friends’ through material connections and arrangements, forging an ineradicable bond from an unexpected association. Raff makes steel weep, and latex interstices, representing the most personal experiences – recognition between strangers, skin on skin, tears at the dinner table – turning industrial materials into things with emotional lives of their own. On closer inspection, these objects bear the unique trace of human touch. Raff’s fingerprints leave calloused textures and rippled surfaces, just as friendship leaves its traces on the human soul, even when old acquaintances have been separated by time and place. Raff’s materials – entangled, embracing – show that people may move away or grow apart, but can never truly separate because there is always some remainder, some trace of that former union. Our only choice is to open ourselves to a shared experience, thinking inter-material sociability as an index of human relationships. Only interacting with someone like us but different from us, in a shared space without idealisations, without forcibly reducing them to our wants, opens the possibility of true friendship.

Text by Max L. Feldman

photo © Gregor Titze

exhibition view

to figure it out, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © Gregor Titze

exhibition view

to figure it out, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © Gregor Titze

story 6, 8, 7, 2015

steel, clay, epoxy resin, paint, wood, ink, 85 x 4 x 4 cm, 60 x 10 x 8 cm,  90 x 14 x 10 cm

to figure it out, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © Gregor Titze

so do i II, 2017

steel sheet, latex, 120 x 60 cm, latex various dimensions

to figure it out, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © Gregor Titze

letting go doesn’t come very naturally to me, 2017

steel sheet, clay, epoxy resin, ø 70 cm, clay variuos dimensions

to figure it out, Gallery Sophie Tappeiner, Vienna, AT, 2017

to figure it out at Sophie Tappeiner

The correlation of the body to its environment determines the existent and experiential relationship between them. Through the development of manifold notions of corporeality, both culminate in a perceptual space. They create a setting comprising an ‚inside‘ and ‚outside,‘ in which referential context is repeatedly dissolved, the fragmentary is permitted. Glances and bodies penetrate one another in mute contact as long as things remain unspoken. The search is for an invisible element that provides structure and depth. Only indirectly does it become tangible, in the cavities, interlacings, and nodal points: a differentiated network of potential relationships in an uncertain terrain, where an interplay of continual give and take occurs. Open your eyes, clear your ears, and generally send your senses ‚outside‘ – enter into a physical-sensory complicity, so to speak, in order to be able to approach the world as something open and to act in the sense of a dialogue. The directive to engage yourself permits a reciprocal relationship of subjective self-referentiality on the one hand and objectively verifiable things on the other. Both entities exist within the space, and at the same time always comport themselves in accordance to it. They explore the periphery of the body through playful and complex possibilities beyond assigned meanings and dialectics, simultaneously becoming the perceiving and the perceived, and thus can no longer be averted or removed. Activated by their material reality and the sensory necessities, they migrate from the body to the wall, into the space. Like a relic that traces the human form and its movements, the shrouding is both delimited from and embedded into its environment. Silhouettes in the form of reduced, condensed representations of a stenciled body begin to become increasingly apparent. Traces of corporeality emerge in the form of objects, as statements suspended within the space or gestural markings translated once more into materiality. Layer by layer, the spatialization and internalization of those objects animated by touch and use begins. To figure it out is ultimately a reflexive entity within a dynamic structure whose contours are to be conceived of organically.

Text by Melissa Canbaz

photo © Rania Moslam

so do i, 2017

steel sheet, latex, silicone, 220 x 145 cm, latex and silicone various dimensions

so do i, solo at One Work Gallery, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © Rania Moslam

photo © Rania Moslam

so do i, 2017

so do i

C das ist eigentlich eine schöne Metapher irgendwie
L wie meinst
C du hast ein Material, du bearbeitest es und dann kannst du es ja nicht ganz kontrollieren irgendwie und das hat auch sowas von, wenn man so ein Amulett hergibt, dann ist es ja auch nicht mehr bei einem, also es hat sowas von diesem Moment, es passiert irgendwas
L stimmt, das gibt man auch wieder ab
C ich hab auch jetzt so eine Rose
L und hältst du sie manchmal in der Hand?
C ja
L ist komisch oder warum macht man das, um sich zu vergewissern das was da ist?
C sich selbst nochmal zu versichern dass man das Gefühl hat man spürt da was
L ich hab das auch manchmal dass man sich selbst angreift es hat schon bei mir viel mit sich an was halten und spüren zu tun vielleicht ist deshalb auch alles immer so haptisch bei mir
C es ist ja eigentlich überlebensgross oder?
L ja, es geht schon nochmal über die Figur hinaus
C dann bist du auch konfrontiert mit sowas grossem, einem sozialen Raum
L bei so was grossem brauchst du immer eine Person die dir hilft
C aber das ist eigentlich wunderschön, es ist beides
C es ist schrecklich aber auch wunderschön, dass du immer eine Person brauchst; du hast dir selbst ein soziales Bedürfnis geschaffen
C welches war das Erste
L i cried twice
C ok my moment is now yours
L jetzt auch
L spricht es zu dir?
C ja
C und wenn ich jetzt überlege dass wir hier jetzt dort drüber sprechen, ok my moment is now yours, das hat ja in diesem jetzigen Moment auch ne ganz besondere Bedeutung, aber auch universell
L ja und das es nicht so eine Meinung vertritt, sondern so offen bleibt, ich lasse gerne offen; ja so viel wie möglich offen lassen

Liesl Raff in conversation with Cathrin Mayer

photo © William Knaack

exhibition view

Tragic Stone Beach, Pferd, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © William Knaack

ring 1, 2017

clay, epoxy resin, ø 100 cm

Tragic Stone Beach, Pferd, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © William Knaack

ring 2, 2017

tin, ø 100 cm

Tragic Stone Beach, Pferd, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © William Knaack

photo © William Knaack

story 1, 3, 2015

story 1, wood, epoxy resin, steel, plaster, paint, stone, 63 x 30 x 40 cm

story 3, wood, concrete, epoxy resin, steel, plaster, clay, paint, 45 x 30 x 30 cm

Tragic Stone Beach, Pferd, Vienna, AT, 2017

photo © Garfield Trummer

exhibition view, 2017

How far to open up?, Forum Stadtpark Graz, AT, 2017

photo © Garfield Trummer

untitled, 2017

steel, oil colour, tin, clay, plastic, dimensions variable

How far to open up?, Forum Stadtpark Graz, AT, 2017

photo © Garfield Trummer

exhibition view, 2017

How far to open up?, Forum Stadtpark Graz, AT, 2017

photo © Garfield Trummer

oh and i thought you were real, 2017

steel sheet, paint, 100 x 75cm

How far to open up?, Forum Stadtpark Graz, AT, 2017

How far to open up?

This exhibition, with its programmatic title How far to open up?, deals with the catalysts for stories. The bits of narration at issue here are based on moments characterized by longing, desire, obsession, and the projections resulting therefrom. Such mental states are frequently of an indeterminate nature and have something ephemeral to them. Their forms and origins reach beyond our understanding, and they always remain intimate. How far can a person go with his or her personal yearnings? How much can we, vulnerable as we are, reveal of ourselves—and how far can an artist take this in her or his work? How far can a work move within its medium, and when can it transcend its format? This first complex of questions lead us to a second one, pertaining to this exhibition’s format and structure: How far can an exhibition go? Who can show works, and how much space in the exhibition can be given over to the artists and their works as such? And what all can an exhibition speak of, what stories can it tell? In the same way that feelings often defy understanding, with the resulting narratives remaining a small part of something that is both far larger and inexpressible, the exhibition space contains clues referring to an act of art production that cannot always be perceived. This goes, for example, for the various performances at the opening, performances that—at every subsequent point in time during the exhibition—will remain only as fragments and remains on the floor. It also goes for the booklet, which functions as its own space within the exhibition. This publication contains texts by artists who need and make use of writing as part of their work but do not necessarily view this practice as part of their outward artistic identities—an example being painters who do a lot of writing. It also contains texts by poets whose networks place them in a certain proximity to the art world. The objects in the exhibition’s various rooms can therefore be viewed as “scrapings”, united in multiple and overlapping spaces, from a field of activity that is understood to be far greater in size. The rooms open up narrative moments visible as gestures and lines within space, for example in the form of drawings and paintings. These works, in a manner not unlike that of comics, represent figurative, dream-like, or tragic scenes as well as lonely still lifes. The films, with their content and statements reinforced by atmospheric impressions, stand out especially for their proximity to written text and the narrative realm. The musical and sound-based works in this exhibition, on the other hand, do without texts and images, since their auditory character opens up a significantly more direct, albeit indescribable, route to being felt. Thus do the artists, authors, and curators move within the exhibition formats of physical space and booklet, along with those states of yearning and desire that but partly lend themselves to realm of the narrative.

Text: Florentine Muhry

photo © Georg Petermichl

untitled (in collaboration with Christoph Meier), 2016

concrete, steel, plastic, various dimensions

A Thousand Friends, Exo Exo at New Jörg, Vienna, AT, 2016

photo © Georg Petermichl

untitled (in collaboration with Christoph Meier), 2016

concrete, steel, plastic, various dimensions

A Thousand Friends, Exo Exo at New Jörg, Vienna, AT, 2016

photo © Christoph Meier

photo © Christoph Meier

untitled (in collaboration with Christoph Meier), 2016

concrete, steel, plastic, various dimensions

photo © Julian Turner

Niemand ist eine Insel (in collaboration with Nora Rekade), 2014

steel, epoxy resin, glass fiber, clay plaster, concrete, paint (4 pieces), 110 x 60 x 60 cm

Parallel Vienna with Bar du Bois, Vienna, AT, 2015

photo © Georg Petermichl

exhibition view

I multiplied myself to feel myself, Kunstraum NÖ, Wien, AT, 2014

photo © Georg Petermichl

Niemand ist eine Insel (in collaboration with Nora Rekade), 2014

steel, epoxy resin, glass fiber, clay plaster, concrete, paint (4 pieces), 110 x 60 x 60 cm

I multiplied myself to feel myself, Kunstraum NÖ, Wien, AT, 2014

photo © Lorenz Seidler

Niemand ist eine Insel (in collaboration with Nora Rekade), 2014

steel, epoxy resin, glass fiber, clay plaster, concrete, paint (4 pieces), 110 x 60 x 60 cm

I multiplied myself to feel myself, Kunstraum NÖ, Wien, AT, 2014

On Intersections, Lines of Connection, Personal Networks and Accomplices

The exhibition „I multiplied myself to feel myself.” On Intersections, Lines of Connection, Personal Networks and Accomplices addresses collaboration in the artistic field as a method and strategy and concerns working relationships that extend the isolated process of creation. Particularly in the field of art, the personal “network” is identity shaping, economically indispensable and a promising breeding ground that constantly needs to be fed. Social networking on the web is the catalyst for this phenomenon – it serves as a means of improving professional efficiency and, as has been seen in recent years, influences artistic production and the concept of the work in many ways. The exhibition sees itself as a setting in which international positions and webs of relationship are shown and on the other hand takes a look at the different forms of cooperation of young artists on the Vienna scene.